top of page

RETAINING NEW PARENTS


Working parents are more stressed than ever. With juggling new school procedures, new work from home routines, added workloads due to coworkers leaving and those finding a new routine in the flex schedule era, parents are at their breaking points. What can we do as organizations to step in and help retain these parents? Check out our newsletter to find out!

 
EVEN A LARGE RAISE IS NOT ENOUGH FOR WORKING PARENTS

“Out of all the benefits listed -- from fertility services to childcare reimbursement -- flexible work hours was at the top of the list of a new poll. New moms would rather have more flexible hours and remote-work options than a salary bump, according to a new survey. The survey of 402 women by Baby Center found that even when offered pay raises of up to $10,000 per year, some still preferred flexible and remote-working options, as they balance work and family responsibilities.


"These findings demonstrate the fact that moms see remote work as a way to reduce the conflict between career and home responsibilities," said Sipra Laddha, perinatal psychiatrist and board member of the BabyCenter Medical Advisory."These statistics highlight the intense juggling act most women do, and the desire to have the two areas of life function with more respect for one another," she added." Learn more


WANT TO RETAIN NEW PARENTS? FOCUS ON THE RETURN TO WORK PHASE.

"While plenty of attention has been given to the need for and length of parental leave, there’s another transitional stage after having or adopting a baby that requires arguably as much focus: the return to work. Often, parents — especially birthing parents — make the decision not to return at all. A February 2020 survey conducted by LinkedIn and Censuswide found that nearly half of moms take an extended break after the birth of their children, with the average time being about two years.


And for those who do return after leave, more than half said they didn’t feel they had a choice in the matter, with finances being the overwhelming driver of the decision. Three career-related fears follow behind: the fear of losing their job, the fear of not being able to move up and the fear of becoming irrelevant in their careers." Learn more


TOP 3 WAYS TO RETAIN AND SUPPORT WORKING PARENTS

"55% of parents at a typical U.S. workplace who are open to changing jobs by the end of this year, according to a July Great Place To Work survey of nearly 4,200 workers. But offering paid paternity leave alone isn’t a silver bullet for retention.


“What sets these companies apart is they have cultures that allow new parents to take paid leave without fear—fear of losing their job, fear of missing out on a promotion, fear of getting left behind,” says Michael C. Bush, CEO of Great Place To Work. “Offering time off in cultures where it can’t really get taken erodes trust.” These cultures also provide employee well-being support. More than 90% of parents at Best Workplaces say they’re encouraged to balance their work and personal lives.


“Offering paid time off for parents is a good start, but what’s their day-to-day experience like when they’re back at work? Can they make it to their kid’s soccer practice and still get promoted down the line? The answer should be ‘yes,’” Bush says. Couple time off and employee wellness support with meaningful work, and you’ve created a workplace that will attract and retain parents." Learn More


DESIGNING AN EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PROGRAM FOR WORKING PARENTS

"We know benefits play a significant role in recruiting and retaining top talent and driving employee productivity. But, to create a competitive benefits stack you’ll need to survey employees, evaluate providers, and keep an eye on the competition to craft an equitable offering for every employee at every life stage.


We’ll walk you through how to design an employee benefits program that better meets your organization’s needs, fits within your budget, and provides employees with the kind of benefits they actually want." Learn more

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All
bottom of page