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EMPLOYEE DISENGAGEMENT HITS 9 YEAR LOW


With all the turmoil and changes that employees have had to face in the past three years it's no surprise the employee disengagement has fallen to a nine year low. In this newsletter we are breaking down the causes and looking at solutions on how we can fix this.

 
WHAT THE SURVEY SAYS

"Employee engagement has reached its lowest level since 2015, according to a new survey released by research firm Gallup. About 32 percent of the 67,000 full- and part-time employees surveyed were engaged in their work in 2022, while 18 percent were actively disengaged. Active disengagement has risen each year since 2020. The remaining respondents—50 percent—were neither engaged nor actively disengaged.



"[2022 showed] the lowest ratio of engaged-to-actively disengaged employees in the U.S. since 2013, almost a decade earlier," the report stated. Engaged employees are "involved in and enthusiastic about their work and workplace," according to the survey. Actively disengaged employees are "disgruntled and disloyal" because most of their workplace needs are unmet." Learn more


WHEN GOOD EMPLOYEES STOP CARING - WHY EMPLOYEES DISENGAGE

"These days, there’s a lot of talk about quiet quitting where employees hunt for a new gig incognito so they can land something better (even if that means no job at all). Why would they do this? Don’t they need money? Shouldn’t they talk to their boss first? Here’s why: unfulfilling jobs are awful. Period. The Great Resignation happened because workers were unwilling to give up hours of their lives being underpaid in dead-end jobs. Employees who were vocal about problems at work weren’t being heard, so they began looking for something better without telling anyone.



How can businesses avoid being blindsided by quiet quitting? Simple: know what it looks like when good employees stop caring. Let’s talk about a few warning signs to watch out for." Learn more


ARE YOU DOING WFH RIGHT?

"Are you doing remote work right? Maybe not. Employee engagement is at its lowest point in a decade, trends like quiet quitting and quiet firing are on the rise, and reports of high employee burnout persist.


Although organizations have spent the past three years adjusting to remote and hybrid work routines, it’s clear that many are still struggling to get a handle on remote work. As we enter a year of economic uncertainty, organizations’ ability to manage remote employees remains a key ingredient for success.


To achieve measurable improvements in employee engagement and productivity, tech executives and HR teams must let go of outdated notions about remote work. Instead, it’s time to develop smarter, more intentional people practices that keep employees’ interests in mind." Learn more

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